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The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda and an Unnecessary War

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The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda and an Unnecessary War

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    Available in PDF Format | The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda and an Unnecessary War.pdf | English
    Thomas J. DiLorenzo(Author)
A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War
Most Americans consider Abraham Lincoln to be the greatest president in history. His legend as the Great Emancipator has grown to mythic proportions as hundreds of books, a national holiday, and a monument in Washington, D.C., extol his heroism and martyrdom. But what if most everything you knew about Lincoln were false? What if, instead of an American hero who sought to free the slaves, Lincoln were in fact a calculating politician who waged the bloodiest war in american history in order to build an empire that rivaled Great Britain's? In The Real Lincoln, author Thomas J. DiLorenzo uncovers a side of Lincoln not told in many history books and overshadowed by the immense Lincoln legend.
Through extensive research and meticulous documentation, DiLorenzo portrays the sixteenth president as a man who devoted his political career to revolutionizing the American form of government from one that was very limited in scope and highly decentralized--as the Founding Fathers intended--to a highly centralized, activist state. Standing in his way, however, was the South, with its independent states, its resistance to the national government, and its reliance on unfettered free trade. To accomplish his goals, Lincoln subverted the Constitution, trampled states' rights, and launched a devastating Civil War, whose wounds haunt us still. According to this provacative book, 600,000 American soldiers did not die for the honorable cause of ending slavery but for the dubious agenda of sacrificing the independence of the states to the supremacy of the federal government, which has been tightening its vise grip on our republic to this very day.
You will discover a side of Lincoln that you were probably never taught in school--a side that calls into question the very myths that surround him and helps explain the true origins of a bloody, and perhaps, unnecessary war.
"A devastating critique of America's most famous president."
--Joseph Sobran, commentator and nationally syndicated columnist
"Today's federal government is considerably at odds with that envisioned by the framers of the Constitution. Thomas J. DiLorenzo gives an account of How this come about in The Real Lincoln."
--Walter E. Williams, from the foreword
"A peacefully negotiated secession was the best way to handle all the problems facing Americans in 1860. A war of coercion was Lincoln's creation. It sometimes takes a century or more to bring an important historical event into perspective. This study does just that and leaves the reader asking, 'Why didn't we know this before?'"
--Donald Livingston, professor of philosophy, Emory University
"Professor DiLorenzo has penetrated to the very heart and core of American history with a laser beam of fact and analysis."
--Clyde Wilson, professor of history, University of South Carolina, and editor, The John C. Calhoun Papers

From the Hardcover edition.

"A devastating critique of America's most famous president."--Joseph Sobran, commentator and nationally syndicated columnist "Today's federal government is considerably at odds with that envisioned by the framers of the Constitution. Thomas J. DiLorenzo gives an account of how this came about in The Real Lincoln."--Walter E. Williams, from the foreword "A peacefully negotiated secession was the best way to handle all the problems facing America in 1860. A war of coercion was Lincoln's creation. It sometimes takes a century of more to bring an important historical event into perspective. This study does just that and leaves the reader asking, 'Why didn't we know this before?' "--Donald Livingston, professor of philosophy, Emory University "Professor DiLorenzo has penetrated to the very heart and core of American history with a laser beam of fact and analysis."--Clyde Wilson, professor of history, University of South Carolina, and editor, The John C. Calhoun Papers-A devastating critique of America's most famous president.---Joseph Sobran, commentator and nationally syndicated columnist -Today's federal government is considerably at odds with that envisioned by the framers of the Constitution. Thomas J. DiLorenzo gives an account of how this came about in The Real Lincoln.---Walter E. Williams, from the foreword -A peacefully negotiated secession was the best way to handle all the problems facing America in 1860. A war of coercion was Lincoln's creation. It sometimes takes a century of more to bring an important historical event into perspective. This study does just that and leaves the reader asking, 'Why didn't we know this before?' ---Donald Livingston, professor of philosophy, Emory University -Professor DiLorenzo has penetrated to the very heart and core of American history with a laser beam of fact and analysis.---Clyde Wilson, professor of history, University of South Carolina, and editor, The John C. Calhoun Papers

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Book details

  • PDF | 368 pages
  • Thomas J. DiLorenzo(Author)
  • Random House USA Children's Books; 1st Pbk. Ed edition (2 Dec. 2003)
  • English
  • 10
  • History

Review Text

  • By Mr. Andrew Crabtree on 12 May 2014

    As Orwell made clear in 1984, history must be subverted in order to fit the current aims and goals of government. My Understanding of Lincoln was (as is taught to school children) that he went to war with his own country to solely free the slaves…….. Its only when you start to really look at a subject and do some research the myth starts to unravel. A wonderfully written book, with plenty of references to the numerous speeches and letters where Lincoln stated that he did not wish to grant freedom to the slaves or allow them access to the Northern states. A fascinating read….

  • By T. MacFarlane on 5 September 2004

    If you accept the idea that the American Civil War was fought over the issue of slavery - the good guys vs the bad guys - be prepared to have your ideas shattered.In truth, it should now be well-known that the war was about the right of states to secede from the Union, slavery providing the trigger.The author's view is that slavery was opposed in the North because it undercut the job prospects of 'free' labour, not necessarily the altruistic motive we have been lead to believe.But DiLorenzo digs deeper, arguing that the original federal-central debate - Jefferson vs Hamilton - was the real issue.Lincoln, according to DiLorenzo was a believer in the Whig/Hamitonian agenda of a strong Federal Government dedicated to a mercantilist economic policy: high tariffs, a strong central bank, and subsidies for 'internal improvements' - such as the railroads.Southern states represented the Jeffersonian agenda: free trade, small government, and no subsidies.According to the author, Lincoln posed no threat to slavery when he won the presidential election of 1860 and, like most white people of his time, he believed that black people were inferior.Even during the war, he believed black people should be encouraged to return to Africa.The war, argues DiLorenzo, gave Lincoln the opportunity to introduce the Whig agenda, and alter the Constitution in favour of the a strong central government. In support of this policy, it was even argued - and continues to be argued, that a central government was deemed to have existed before the states.DiLorenzo argues that George III signed a treaty with each of the thirteen states, and not a central government.Conclusion: Jefferson lost, and he lost because Lincoln won.You may not agree, but you will find this book a most stimulating read.Finally, from a British perspective, think of Jefferson and Hamilton in an EU context: will the states of Europe take the same journey from being a confederacy to one in which Brussels is all powerful? We need to think hard on this issue, before it is too late.

  • By Andrew R. Barnard on 3 January 2011

    Today Lincoln has been immortalized as the great promoter of freedom and equality. Everything he has done is assumed to be good and right, even when all logic and reason says otherwise. Tom Dilorenzo's book has revealed the monstrous myths that overshadow the actual happenings of Lincoln's life and presidency. Dilorenzo offers the idea that perhaps Lincoln's entire presidency was not spent giving freedom and liberties but in taking them away. And while many people will not like it, he's quite right.Chapter 1: Introduction. Here Dilorenzo prepares the reader for what will come in the remainder of the book. He briefly describes the subjects of the following chapters.Chapter 2: Lincoln's Opposition to Racial Equality. While Lincoln has been portrayed as an abolitionist, here it is made clear that this idea is nothing short of total nonsense. Dilorenzo gives numerous quotes from Lincoln himself that imply that Lincoln thought the blacks an inferior race that did not deserve the rights granted to whites. During his debates with Douglass, Lincoln said, "Free them, and make them politically and socially our equals? My own feelings will not admit of this.... We cannot, then, make them equals."Chapter 3: Why not peaceful Emancipation? Dilorenzo explains how nearly every other country in the world was able to end slavery peacefully. Not only did Lincoln say that he believed he had no right to free the slaves, but he said in his First Inaugural Address that he supported a constitutional amendment that would prohibit the Federal Government from ever interfering with southern slavery again. Dilorenzo also argues that the Emancipation Proclamation was really just a piece of political trickery, an opinion held by the majority of spectators in England. As Lincoln's secretary of state William Seward mockingly said, " We show our sympathy for slavery by emancipating slaves where we cannot reach them and holding them in bondage where we can set them free."Chapter 4: Lincoln's Real Agenda. Lincoln was the disciple of Hamilton and Clay, both of whom were strongly in favor of a highly centralized Federal Government. The so-called "American System" of Clay favored high protective tariffs, internal improvements, and centralized banking. This corrupt system gave subsidies to corporations of their own choosing; they could not possibly support all businesses. Nearly all the subsidies went to the north, but the south was not exempt from paying the tariff. When the south seceded, along with it went the tax dollars Lincoln would need to accomplish his goal. No wonder Lincoln was so upset by the southern succession.Chapter 5: The Myth of Secession as Treason. Nearly all the founding fathers believed in secession, as did the general public. After all, they had just fought a war of succession against England. They had revolted against what they considered violations of their personal liberties - liberties that are quite insignificant by today's standards. The very idea that they would then form a government that would give supreme power to the Federal Government is absolutely absurd. Secession was threatened many times before 1861, including by New England during the War of 1812. Never was the constitutional right of secession questioned, only the wisdom of secession in the present situation. In fact, Dilorenzo reveals the forgotten move for secession in the Mid-Atlantic states around the time of the southern secession.Chapter 6: Was Lincoln a dictator? Here Dilorenzo uncovers quite shocking information of Lincoln's violation of the constitution, particularly his suspension of the writ of Habeas Corpus. Dozens of newspaper editors were thrown in jail without trial for their opposition to Lincoln's administration. Clement Vallandigham, a U.S. representative from Ohio, was deported without trial from his home for being a "traitor". In reality, he was only protesting against the unwise moves the government was making.Chapter 7: Waging War Against Civilians. Lincoln and his generals clearly violated the international code of warfare by killing civilians and damaging their property. Dilorenzo gives us painful details of the inhumane methods used to subdue the south.Chapter 8: Reconstructing America. Dilorenzo explains the unjust methods used after the end of the war. The south was forced back into the union, but it was not granted any of the liberties given to the north. The way they were dealt with reinforces the fact that no one was ever able to offer a historically accurate argument against the constitutionality of secession.Chapter 9: Diloronzo expounds on much of the previous material.Chapter 10: The costs of Lincoln's War. Dilorenzo explains how the wounds of the Civil War and Lincoln's policies haunt us still.Highly recommended. While this book may be troubling, it is absolutely essential for anyone wanting to understand the real Lincoln.(Copied from my review on Amazon.com)

  • By D.J. Brennan on 29 August 2016

    Shows another side to this very popular President. Even his young secretary John Hay is on record that Lincoln would not have been revered had he not been assassinated. Hay went on to become a Secretary of State.

  • By Karl Skid Marks The First. on 1 August 2016

    Nice one Tom keep up the good work. Suitable foil for the propaganda of Hollywood. Eye watering stuff.

  • By Flavio on 16 July 2011

    A very interesting book; all aspects are covered with the right approach, and fully explained. Yet it requires a solid knowledge of facts, and backrounds to be fully understood.

  • By jmak on 13 August 2014

    Brilliant exposure of one of history's most propitiously misrepresented figures.

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